Creating Compelling Offers That Candidates Say Yes To

Attracting and hiring the top candidates for your food manufacturing company is becoming increasingly complex. In the age of the “Great Resignation”, professionals have grown more discerning about where they want to work.

Today’s top talent has endless employment opportunities, not just from local businesses but global teams hiring remote employees.

To thrive in this landscape, business leaders need to know how to create the most compelling job offers, to stand out to the most qualified candidates.

The question is, as manufacturing employee preferences and priorities continue to evolve, how do you ensure your job offer makes the right impact?

Here are some of the top strategies you can use to improve your chances of your candidates saying “yes”.

1. Assess Your Company Culture

Culture is growing increasingly important to today’s food candidates. 46% of employees say company culture is vital to their decision of which business to work for. Top performers are consistently attracted to organisations that share their personal values, ethics, and priorities.

What’s more, many of the best candidates in the market today want to see evidence they’re going to be employed in a purpose-led job with genuine meaning. Assessing your company culture and how you highlight your values to your candidates is an important step in making your offer more compelling. Ask yourself what kind of values you highlight in your job descriptions, your business website, and even the reviews and testimonials shared by existing employees.

Does your business reward teamwork and innovation? Do you strongly focus on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, to ensure everyone feels aligned in your workforce?

2. Refine Your EVP

After you’ve ensured you’re sending the right message with your company culture, it’s time to start looking at your Employee Value Proposition (EVP). Your EVP is essentially everything you offer your candidates to set yourself apart from other employers in the manufacturing space.

While there’s more to a good EVP than salary, it’s worth ensuring you’re paying your employees what they deserve. Research the typical pay rates for the kind of jobs you’re trying to fill and make sure you take the value of your candidate’s knowledge, skills, and experience into account.

Beyond a competitive pay package, you can also improve your EVP by looking at benefits, flexible working styles, and more.

Once you’ve defined your EVP, make sure it stands out wherever you’re going to be interacting with candidates. Share information about your benefits and opportunities on your website, and discuss options with potential talent during the interview process.

3. Focus on Empathy and Flexibility

In the last couple of years, the priorities of many manufacturing candidates have evolved in a few key areas. Perhaps the most important factors most leaders are looking for today are empathy, and flexibility. Demonstrating empathy as an employer shows your talent you respect their needs and want to contribute to their wellbeing.

Creating wellness initiatives designed to keep employees healthy and happy is a great way to make your job offer more appealing to all kinds of candidates. Share information on your site about mental health days you’ve offered for your staff or the on-site support you offer for the personal needs of your employees.

From a flexibility perspective, think about how you can adapt to the new working styles of top manufacturing candidates. Many of today’s professionals are looking for opportunities to work from home, even part-time, to give them a better sense of work/life balance.

You could even go a step further and experiment with concepts like the four-day work week to give your employees the potential of longer, more rejuvenating weekends. One great way to show empathy and flexibility at the same time is to ask your candidates about their specific needs during the interview process.

4. Demonstrate Opportunities for Growth

Today’s food professionals want to know there’s a future in any company they’re going to be working for. According to Gallup, 59% of millennials prioritise opportunities to learn and grow when deciding which jobs to apply for.

Making sure your candidates are aware of the opportunities they’ll have to grow in your business will make your job offer more compelling. You can discuss the promotion paths you’ve offered in the past with your candidates during the interview and outline the training and educational opportunities offered within your job description.

You might even let your possible hires know about the onboarding process you’ll use to welcome them into your organisation, during which you can both work together to outline a path for progression through the company.

It’s also helpful to share information about the development opportunities you offer online. Videos and written testimonials from employees who have achieved their personal and professional goals with your business can make a huge impact.

5. Work with a Specialist Recruiter

Finally, if you really want to ensure your job offers make the right impact, it’s worth investing in some specialist support. A food manufacturing recruitment agency knows exactly what it takes to align the right candidates with the correct employers from day one. They can help you to seek out people who are actively looking for the benefits, and culture you offer.

Recruiters can save you time by sorting through your job applications and eliminating anyone who might not fit well with your company. They can also provide advice on how you can position yourself to your candidates when you’re writing job descriptions and conducting interviews.

With a specialist recruiter, you can boost your chances of a“yes” when you need it most by building a pipeline of manufacturing candidates, all carefully chosen to match your business needs. Working with the right team will reduce the stress associated with building the ideal team.

By Scott Williams

I’m an independent owner of Food Recruit.

Passionate about the Food Manufacturing industry, having spent time as a Supply Chain Manager and Business Development Manager for two of the UK’s largest meat importers.

High Care, Low Care, Chilled and Ambient I have worked across all markets, including B2B, Foodservice, Wholesale and Retail.

I fell into recruitment in 2016 to start a Food & Drink desk in a long-standing Engineering Recruitment business in the West Midlands.

Progressing on to Business Development Manager, covering multiple markets before starting my agency in September 2020.

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